Quiet Form

[Introduction]
[Ascending Form]

[Contrapuntal Forms]

[Quiet Form]

[Conversation with Magic Stones]

[Back to Rhythm of the Stones]

The sculpture that gives this trio its name comes from the 1970s and was included at the suggestion of Yorkshire Sculpture Park curator Clare Lilley. In the centenary exhibition this sculpture was specially moved for the music’s first performance to enable the audience and performance to surround this beautiful white marble object.

 

Quiet Form provides a still centre to a sequence of intensely rhythmic and contrapuntal music. Whilst no precise dynamics or articulations are marked the electric keyboard part in particular is made up of harmonic blocks whose resonance should ebb and flow. The alto flute part should be quietly expressive, savouring opportunities for colourful vibrato and articulation at a dynamic between pianissimo and mezzo-piano. The double bass part may be played arco or pizz or a mixture of the two, but predominantly sul tasto. Where possible, particularly in live performance, the performers might experiment with ghosting notes, even short phrases, so that the music appears to suddenly disappear in random moments between each part, although each player might ‘appear’ to be sounding it.

[Introduction]

[Ascending Form]

[Contrapuntal Forms]

[Quiet Form]

[Conversation with Magic Stones]

[Back to Rhythm of the Stones]

 

Quiet Form

 

If I were quiet,

my form timeless

as polished marble

but fecund still,

between breast

and belly folded

arms would hide

my pierced body

where life lurks

to quicken, coiled

in shine and shiver

around the hole

through which spirit

must catch aquatic

air in mid-swim.

So quiet waits

life, quilted

in polished glow

of a stone torso,

for birth qualms.

– Margaret Morgan 2003

Downloads

Score [pdf]

Recording by BBCNOW trio [mp3]

Web presentation [swf]